Rick Santorum, former Senator from Pennsylvania, had won only one of the contests thus far in the 2012 Republican Primary season – Iowa – and that only after the contest had been over for a week, and initially called for Mitt Romney. Trailing Romney, Newt Gingrich and even at some points, Ron Paul in delegates and votes, it seemed as if Santorum would never be able to connect with voters to make a case for himself as a viable presidential candidate.

Many conservatives had expressed admiration for Santorum and strongly desired to see him succeed and become the nominee, but his apparent inability to gain traction with voters left him as a sideshow both in debates and following contests. Even an endorsement by evangelical leaders just prior to the South Carolina primary was unable to sway enough voters.

After Romney won (initially) in Iowa, and followed it up with another win in New Hampshire. Seemingly unbeatable, he was trounced by Gingrich in South Carolina, following a combative debate performance in which Gingrich lambasted the mainstream media, using Juan Williams (formerly of NPR, now with FOX) as his whipping boy. Romney recovered to win convincingly in Florida and Nevada, with Santorum barely registering. Indeed, Santorum had already conceded both contests and was on the road in Colorado, Minnesota and Missouri, hoping to win at least one of the fights. With Romney riding a wave of wins, it seemed all but certain that the former Governor of Massachusetts would add to his win column.

Then a confluence of events – a “Perfect Storm” of political proportions occurred at just the right time to give Santorum the boost he needed.  On January 20, the Obama Regime, through the department of Human Health Services and its leader Kathleen Sebelius, decided to enforce the ObamaCare dictates requiring that Catholic institutions provide abortifacients, contraceptives and sterilization coverage to their employees – something abhorrent to their deeply held religious convictions, and protected by the Constitution. Catholics and Evangelical Christians as well as all people who strongly support the Constitutional protections against government interference in religious practices and beliefs exploded in outrage at the heavy-handed attempt to force faith-based organizations to set aside their religious beliefs in the name of bureaucratic domineering.

On February 1, the Susan G. Komen for the Cure foundation announced it was cancelling funding it had previously been providing to Planned Parenthood, ostensibly to support breast exams and mammograms – which seems to be a service that Planned Parenthood does not provide:

Within hours of announcing the severing of the relationship, Komen’s website was hacked by malicious leftists, liberal congressional representatives were demanding that the funding be restored, and liberal pro-abortion groups were threatening to make the decision a fatal one for the cancer-fighting organization. Conservative supporters of the SGK foundation were first shocked to find out that an organization to which they were donating money was then providing some of that money to an organization most commonly known for providing abortion services, and then shocked at the hate-filled rage the organization received from the left. Following the threats and attacks, the Susan G. Komen for the Cure foundation reversed its initial decision within days, restoring funding to Planned Parenthood, disillusioning conservative donors even more.

Finally, on February 7, the same day as the contests in Colorado, Minnesota and Missouri, the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals in San Francisco ruled that Proposition 8, effectively a gay marriage ban in California was unconstitutional – despite the fact that a majority of California residents had voted in favor of amending the state’s constitution. The justices effectively ruled that the Proposition was a only a bigoted attempt to deny rights to a portion of the population and an irrational attempt to protect the misguided ideal of the sanctity of marriage. The last straw before the contests of the day finally broke the proverbial camel’s back. Conservatives voted in droves – not for the inevitable nominee in Romney, but the candidate who most fervently stood on the side of true conservatism, Santorum.

With the wins firmly in hand, Santorum (and the other candidates) now head to this weekend’s CPAC – the Conservative Political Action Conference, where historically, party leaders have coalesced around the eventual nominee. It remains to be seen if anyone will emerge from the conference with a mantle of approval, but for Conservatives, the odds just got a lot better.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s